Get Out the Door and Run: Jeff Galloway Tips

I have written posts on being motivated to run before, but as a part of the Jeff Galloway blogger program, I was sent some great tips I wanted to share with you. Sometimes we can come up with every excuse in the book as to why a run today isn’t a good idea, but in the end, have you ever regretted a run? I haven’t! Check out Jeff’s tips below:

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1. Coffee? As you are dressing, brew some coffee, tea, or have a diet drink, etc. Caffeine (if you have no problems with it) will wake up the central nervous system, making exercise feel better.
2. Eat a snack. Low blood sugar is the most common reason for low motivation in the afternoon. An easy-to-digest snack will raise the level so that you feel good and will reduce the negative messages received from the stress-monitoring part of the brain (the left brain).
3. Weather? Just walk out the front door to see what the weather is like.
4. If you are using exercise equipment in a health club, check the availability and walk around the equipment until the user has finished his or her workout.
5. If outside, walk to the end of the block to get your bearings. Once you have walked 100 steps you are almost certain to continue.  If using a treadmill, commit to walking 100 steps, then commit to running 100 steps.

Have a reward afterward, such as a snack, a beverage, or a massage – you earned it!

There is a principle of lazy physics here: “A body on the couch wants to stay on the couch. But once a body is in motion it wants to stay in motion.”

QOTD: What is your best tip for motivating yourself to run?

Running With Kids

Jeff Galloway is back sharing his running wisdom, and I am passing it on to you today. I was excited to read this article since I now have a toddler to LOVES to run (in particular… away from me.) She is even entered to run in her very first runDisney kids race next April, and currently loves when we go for walks around the block—she runs a lot of the way! Check out this research Jeff shares about kids and running, and his tips for making it an enjoyable experience for everyone.

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Kids think and learn better when they exercise regularly, according to research.  Whether you run with your child, a  niece/nephew/grandchild, or a neighborhood kid, you can make a positive impact  on a young life.
Why  is running with kids such a great thing to do? Most kids like to do things with an adult.  By running comfortably with a child you can positively imprint exercise as a natural and expected part of the daily routine, that is fun.
What does  running do for kids–better than other sports? Kids who run tend to have better self esteem, better grades, and are happier.  Unlike other sports, that require specific skills, any kid can run and walk.  When running, you have one of the best opportunity for quality time.  The most powerful reward for most kids is the special attention an adult gives to a child during and after a run.

How do I know  when a child is ready to run?  Running is a natural activity.  Unfortunately, many kids have have had bad experiences because they have run until they were exhaused.  Tell the child that you really want to go on a walk/run with him or her.  Offer a simple reward (a special snack such as juice, a toy).  Insert walk breaks every minute, before the child huffs and puffs, and stop before the child is tired.

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For kids ages 6 and under:
How long should I let a  kid this age run? Usually between 10 and 20 seconds at first.
How much of our ‘run’ should be spent  walking? Walk for a minute or two between run segments.
What should I be careful of?  Most kids can run farther and faster than they should at this age.  Make sure the segments are short so that there is no huffing and puffing.  Make each session playful and stop before the child is really tired.
Ages 7 to 9:
How long should I  let a kid run?  Start with about a quarter of a mile(one lap around a track).  Increase by 1-2 tenths of a mile each run until you reach one mile.  For kids that really enjoy running, you could gradually increase the distance to 3.5 miles (one day a week) and enter a 5K.  Be sure to keep the pace slow during the first mile of the first race, with walk breaks every 1-2 minutes.
What is a good run/walk ratio for a kid this  age? Jog for 10-20 seconds/walk for 40-50 seconds.  After two weeks, if this seems “too easy”, increase the amount of running each week by 5 seconds and decrease the walking by 5 seconds until you are using 30 seconds/30 seconds.  For the kids that want more, gradually increase to one min/one min, then 2 min run while inserting 1 min walk.  As kids want to run more, you can increase the running but walk when the child starts to huff and puff.
What should I be careful of (are they prone to going to hard and  crashing and burning?) If you sense that the kid is struggling, walk more.  This usually improves attitude and conserves energy for a strong finish.  It’s OK to run a little faster at the end but don’t run all-out.  It is OK to let the child “win” each run.
Ages 10 to 12:
How long? Beginner kids that are out of shape should follow the suggestion for ages 7-9 at first.  For moderately active 10-12 year olds (soccer players, etc.) start with about half a mile.  Increase by about a quarter of a mile on each run until you reach 1.5 to 2 miles—or whatever distance seems to feel comfortable but satisfying.
What’s a good run/walk ratio for this age  group?  Kids that are just starting, should follow the suggestion for  ages 7-9.  Kids that have been running (soccer, etc) can jog for 10-20 seconds each minute during a 10 minute warmup and find the ratio that avoids huffing and puffing: 1-1, 2 min  run/1min walk, then 3-1, and only 4-1 if a kid has no problem with this.
What should I be aware of (are they actually likely to kick my  butt?)  Many 10 to 12 year olds can run very fast at the beginning, and burn out later.  Keep the pace slow for the first third of the run.
Is this age child old enough to run a 10-K?  Most kids who gradually build mileage to 6.5 miles, once a week, will have no problem with a 10K if you help them start slowly, with walk breaks every2- 3 minutes or so.
How is  it possible to get a real workout in when running with a  kid? Don’t worry about your workout, try to make the child’s experience a good one.  Many adult mentors run their workouts before or after running with the child athlete.
What’s the best way to  bring a child along on my runs—even if she can’t keep up on her own  two feet?  Slow down and walk more.  Playing games allows for the distance to go by quickly.  If the child is laughing and running you have been a successful coach.

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Register now –www.jeffgalloway131.com

QOTD: Do your kids like to run? have they ever done a race before?

On Running Fast

Oh how I love to run fast. In High school, I was a sprinter, and loved the 100 meter dash and anchoring the 4 x 100 meter relay. There is just something about the adrenaline and the thrill of going as fast as you can…but only for a short time. I’m not so good at running fast to GET faster, but I’m working on it! Here are some tips to help if you are looking to run FAST to get faster that I was given as a Jeff Galloway Blogger:

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Why is running faster a good thing?  Short and fast segments not only help you run faster in races.  If you run a few faster segments each week you can improve your running efficiency while receiving a better attitude boost.
How long should you be running before you add some faster running in? After 2-3 months of regular running some short accelerations can be added with minimal risk of aches and pains.

Is it possible that running fast can actually be fun?  Yes.  The secret is be creative and limit the length of the fast segment at first.
How often should you run fast? Playful speed can be done once or twice a week.

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Four Faster, Fun Workouts
1. Speed play that you can do on your own. ACCELERATE AND GLIDE.  After an easy 10 minute warmup of slow running, pick up the pace for 10 steps, then coast off the momentum for 10-20 steps.  Don’t be obsessed about the number of steps as this is just a guideline.  Don’t sprint–be playful.  Gradually pick up the pace, and then glide back down to a jog.  Repeat 2-3 times on your first attempt, and take a one minute walk break.  Each week you could increase the number of accelerations as you wish, with a recommended walk break of 1-2 minutes between each.

2. Speed play you can do with one friend—CHASE game.  After an easy 5 minute jog together, one person takes the lead.  As the leader changes the pace (speeding up, then slowing down, speeding up) the follower tries to stay close but not pass.  After 3-5 minutes, take a 1-2 minute walk break and repeat with the other runner leading.  Repeat as many times as desired.
3. Speed play you can do with two friends—SURPRISE game. Following the same format as game 1, the follower tries to surprise the leader by passing gently but quickly.  While there should be no sprinting, it is OK to run fast for 10-30 steps to pass.
4. A speed play workout you can do with three or more friends—INDIAN RUNNING.  The group is running single file for a minute or two at an easy pace.  Then, the last runner, passes all of the other runners and takes the lead for a minute or two.  The current leader sets the pace, and takes a walk break.  When the running resumes, the last runner starts to move to the front.  Each runner gets to take the lead at least once in this game.

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The 2015 Jeff Galloway 13.1 Virtual Race is closing on March 21st! This is a great way to earn an awesome medal and one of the best race shirts around! Run a 5K or half marathon in your town and be a part of the Jeff Galloway 13.1 Virtual Race!
Register at Virtual Race Registration.

Can You PR with Run/Walk/Run Method?

I feel like this is a question a lot of people ask. To a newer runner, the thought of running 13.1 or 26.2 miles is daunting, and I understand the concern. I have personally used both methods (straight run and Jeff Galloway run/walk) and have PR’ed both ways. Let’s take a look at what Jeff Galloway himself has to say on the matter:

“How can runners, even Boston Qualifiers, run faster by taking walk breaks? I know, it’s counter-intuitive but in numerous surveys I’ve found that former non-walk-break runners improve an average of more than 13 minutes when they walk early and often.
How does it work?  Those who have a strategy almost always do better than those who just get out there and see what happens.  A muscle, etc., that is used constantly will fatigue and break down more quickly.  By taking scheduled walk breaks, the muscles stay strong and resilient to  the finish.  The principle behind walk breaks is “Conservation of energy”.

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PR doing a straight run at Princess Half marathon


How can you run a faster marathon with walk breaks? 
Almost everyone who runs continuously experiences a slowdown during the last 3-6 miles. Runners who use strategic walk breaks from the beginning tend to either speed up at the end or at least avoid slowing down.
Can you actually set a PR with the run/walk method?  I hear from thousands every year who set Personal Records by using the method.

How does the run/walk method protect you against injury?  Each runner has certain “weak links” that ache more and are common injury sites. Continuous use of the muscle will first cause the muscle to fatigue early, reducing muscle performance.  Continuing to run run under increasing fatigue will cause muscle, tendon and joint damage.  Walk breaks stop the abuse of a weak link, allowing the tissue to adapt, significantly reducing aches, injuries and recovery time.
How does the run/walk method affect your day-to-day recovery? Because there is less damage to repair after a run, the legs, knees, etc., feel better, sooner.  Many report that by using my run-walk-run method they can run the next day after a marathon. Some injured runners have been able to train for and run marathons while the injury gradually healed.  Walk breaks can keep  one below the threshold of further irritation. “

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PR doing a run/walk/run LA marathon

I can attest that when I run/walk, I recover faster and am less sore after the race. It’s a lower risk of injury for me, and it makes the distance not seem so impossible. My full marathon PR is from a run/walk, and my half marathon PR is from a straight run. I have never tried to PR with a run/walk in the half, but am curious as to what my results would be!

Don’t forget you can still register for the Jeff Galloway virtual race!

QOTD: Do you run/walk? Have you ever PR’ed doin’ the Galloway method?

As a Jeff Galloway blogger I am provided with tips to share with my readers.

Having a Training Plan

I have discussed training plans a couple of times on my blog lately as we move into the fall season, so these tips from Jeff Galloway came at a great time! I hope you find them as helpful as I did.

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WHY SHOULD I HAVE A TRAINING PLAN? When using a proven strategy, a runner gains control over fatigue while improving motivation. Those who follow the right training plan, for the individual, tend to improve more, with less injury risk.
WOULD BEGINNERS BENEFIT MORE FROM A PLAN Unfortunately, most beginners “run as they feel” or follow conflicting advice. This leads to confusion and more aches and pains. The right schedule will systematically increase the type of running needed for a goal, with strategic rest for rebuilding.
KEY TRAINING ELEMENTS:

1) A longer run builds endurance, 2) a hilly run builds strength, 3) Scenic or social runs insert fun and keep you coming back for more.
WHAT IS ADDED TO A PLAN IF THE GOAL IS TO RUN FASTER? The right training plan will gradually increase the speed repetitions needed for the individual goal. Easier days and rest days must be inserted before and after speed workouts. To avoid injury, the pace and the increase must be realistic for the individual.
EVERY OTHER DAY! Most runners—especially beginners—run best when they run every other day. This allows for the “weak links” to heal. The very slow long run is usually on the weekend, when there is more time available. Hills and fun days can be run on the short runs during the week (for example,Tuesday and Thursday)

SHOULD I EXERCISE ON NON-RUNNING DAYS? While you don’t have to exert yourself on non running days to improve your running, exercise will energize your mind, and improve your attitude and vitality—while burning some fat. So I recommend any exercise that does not fatigue the calf muscle, such as recreational walking.
DOES VARIETY HELP? Changing things a bit can improve motivation. You don’t have to change the “mission” on specific days, but alternating some of the courses or running with different groups can make each day more interesting.

WHAT ARE VARIOUS MISSIONS, FOR VARIOUS DAYS? Each type of run bestows a different benefit. Hill runs build strength. Drills that work on cadence, gentle acceleration and gliding will improve your running form. Long runs produce stamina and endurance.

WHAT SHOULD I DO THE DAY BEFORE AND THE DAY AFTER LONG OR FASTER RUNS? Take it easy on these days. Do little or no exercise, don’t over-eat, drink 8 glasses of water/sports drinks, and focus on how you will enjoy the next run.
SHOULD I SKIP THE REST DAYS—TO IMPROVE MORE QUICKLY. Not Recommended! It is during the days off from running that the running body rebuilds and improves. While some runners can get away with running short and slow runs on rest days for a while, these “junk miles” can compromise recovery and lead to injuries.

IF I DON’T LIKE A WORKOUT CAN I SUBSTITUTE? Following a consistent plan is more likely to lead to success and improve motivation. Those who pick various elements from different schedules experience more burnout and injury.

QOTD: Anything you would add to this?

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  • Jeff Galloway 13.1 – Sunday, Dec. 13th
  • Barb’s 5K Presented byBeeCause – Saturday, Dec. 12th
  • NEW Fit Kids Run/Walk -Saturday, Dec. 12th

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*As a Jeff Galloway blogger I receive these tips to share with my readers.

Jeff Galloway Tips: Dealing with the Heat

Hey friends! These tips for dealing with the heat from Jeff Galloway could not have come at a better time! We are in the middle of a serious heat wave here in the south (our daily heat index has been around 107 with high humidity) and running has been difficult. Please enjoy these tips:

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Training through the summer can not only be grueling, but down right dangerous.  Here are some tips to train safely and as comfortable as possible in the hot summer months.

Slow down by 30 sec/mile (20 sec/km) for every 5F temperature increase above 55-60F ( every 2.5C above 14C)

When the temperature is over 70F (21C) you may take a 5 minute “cold shower break” every 25-30 minutes to keep cool.

Try to complete your run before the sun rises above the horizon.

More frequent walk breaks during hot weather can lower body temperature increase.  If you used to run 3 minutes between walk breaks, run only 90 seconds (walk 30 seconds) at 70F (21C) and at 80F (26C) drop to 60 sec run/30 sec walk or 30/30

When you start to heat up more than normal, take a longer walk in a mall or indoor AC building

Pick shady courses on hot days.

Don’t wear a hat!  Pour water over your head

Have an indoor alternative—treadmill, etc

Run in the deep end of the pool, using a flotation belt

QOTD: What is your best tip for running n hot weather?

Disclosure: As a Jeff Galloway blogger I am given special tips to share with you, my readers. No compensation has been given to me.

Jeff Galloway: The 30 Second Walk Break

It’s time for some more words of wisdom from Jeff Galloway! As a part of his blogger program, I receive tips that I then share with you. I found this set of tips particularly interesting. I use the run/walk/run for marathons and have thought about trying it out for a half marathon. I am never quite sure which interval to use, but today’s tips cleared things up for me and make a lot of sense. Going to try this out on my next run!

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The 30 second Walk Break

Jeff Galloway’s Run/Walk/Run method was revolutionary for three reasons:

1 – Run/Walk/Runners felt better throughout the long run.
2 – Run/Walk/Runners recovered faster and got injured less often.

3 – Run/Walk/Runners went faster with the breaks than without.

Since his introduction of walk breaks in 1974, Jeff he has received feedback from hundreds of thousands of runners, allowing him to fine tune Run/Walk/Run to keep people feeling better, staying healthy, and running faster.

 

The greatest benefit of the walk break comes in the first 30 sec.

Our heart rates come down, the running muscles relax, we catch our breaths, and the fatigue melts away.

After 30 seconds of walking, we tend to slow down.

Here is a typical example of what happens with a 1-minute walk break:

A run/walk/runner averaging 10-minute pace in a marathon using 3 min/1min might walk at a 15-minute mile pace for the first part of the race.
As fatigue sets in, that walk gets slower, and by halfway, the runner may be walking at 18 min/mi.

This means faster running is needed to stay on pace, which creates more fatigue at the end of each running segment, so the walk will get slower, and so goes the downward spiral at the end of the race.

 

Avoiding the Slow-down

Compared to running constantly, the 1-minute walk break still results in runners feeling better, staying healthier, and going faster, but it can get even better! Limiting walk breaks to 30 seconds, or in some cases even less, while cutting the run time accordingly, gives all the same benefits, with even less fatigue and even faster times.

 

The Bottom Line

If you are in already using a 30-second walk break or less, you don’t need to adjust. If you are using an interval that takes a 1-minute walk break, keep the same ratio but cut your walk and run times in half. For example, a 1-minute/1-minute interval now becomes a 30-sec./30-sec. interval. It’s that simple.

QOTD: Have you ever tried the run/walk/run strategy?

The Power of the Group

Below are some more tips from Jeff Galloway I received as a Jeff Galloway blogger. I especially love this set of tips, because it’s something I have been harping on for a few weeks now.

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I got out of my comfort zone to run with a group, and I am really enjoying it and hopefully it will make me a faster runner! Check them out below, after a few words from Jeff:

The fun of running with a group pulled me into the sport 57 years ago.  Running and training with my friends Steve Prefontaine, Frank Shorter Bill Rodgers, brought out the best of running in me—while we became good friends, and Olympians.  As I travel the US this season, for our Galloway training program kickoffs, I see the same fun, support and friendship development.  I hope to see many of you at our free clinics.  Here are the ways I’ve observed runners of all abilities improve more and have more fun when in the right group.

1. Great friendships

2. The miles go by quicker—telling stories, sharing life experiences

3. Guidance in running with the right group for you, with the appropriate run walk run strategy

4. Because the group is waiting for you, you will stay motivated and get out there more often

5. You’ll learn about some interesting races, places to run, fun running experiences

6. On the really tough workouts and races, the group will pull you through

7. Access to tools for management of nutrition, fluids, motivation, aches/pains

8. The right group leadership can fine-tune the pace of each workout, avoiding injury/exhaustion

9. Helping others who are struggling bestows an amazing sense of achievement

10. Sharing the empowerment of finishing a long run can change your life

Most groups, like our Galloway programs allow runners to try them out for free.  Together we can celebrate fitness and inspire others to improve the quality of their lives.

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I particularly love tip number 4. I paid to do a speed work group, so the thought of wasting that money, AND knowing my group is out there rain or shine motivates me to go run. I’m not the best running self motivator, so this works so well for me!

Visit http://www.jeffgalloway.com/training-groups/list-of-cities/ to find your closest Galloway Training Program.

QOTD: What is your favorite thing about running with a group?

Jeff Galloway Tips: 4 Ways to Energize Your Day and Clear Your Brain

As a Jeff Galloway blogger, I am provided with running tips to share with all of you. Here is the latest installment.

Four Ways To Energize Your Day & Clear Your Brain
By Olympian Jeff Galloway
www.RunInjuryFree.com

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It’s natural to become focused on the big things in life, and worry about outside forces, building stress.  A few simple lifestyle adjustments can result in greater control over attitude and energy, while reducing stress and fatigue.  Yes, you can exert more control over your life, produce positive attitude hormones, and blend together body, mind and spirit by planning and taking action.

•        Walk or run, one day and a walk (or cross train) the next.  While the exertion will wake up the muscles, you’re away from the phone, allowing the mind a little freedom.  Most who start with a blank mental state, finish their exercise session with the day planned, and a few new ways to deal with problems.  Others like to walk/run during lunch hour, while munching on an energy bar.  This can clear out morning stress and prepare mind-body for the challenges of the afternoon.  Many evening exercisers believe that the weight of the day’s stress is erased or contained with the after-work workout.  Scheduling these outings gives you control over your existence.

•        Don’t sit–walk!.  The addition of a few extra short walks, throughout the day, will energize the body and activate the mind.  Park farther away from work, the food store, the transit station, etc.  Many of my clients use a step counter for motivation and calorie counting.  It helps to find one that is consistent and reliable (usually @ $30).  Shoot for 10,000 steps a day.  You are rewarded for  getting out of your chair (or  the couch) more often.  These short walks burn fat, which adds up (up to 30 pounds a year!).  The best reward is the head clearing effect, which can power you through the mid morning or mid afternoon energy crises.  Even a 3-4 minute “recess” walk at work, can result in clearer thinking, more energy, and greater self-confidence.

•        Eat more frequently.  Each time you eat, even a small snack, you’ll boost your energy level. The longer you wait to eat, the more likely your metabolism will slump into drowsiness and laziness.  This also means that you’re not burning many calories.  If you divide up your daily calorie budget into 6-9 snacks a day you’ll burn more fat (up to 10 pounds a year).  Eat a snack every 2-3 hours, and you can feel better all day.  It helps to choose foods that have (percentage of calories vs total calories) about 20% protein, about 15% fat and the rest in complex carbohydrate.  This combination will leave you satisfied longer with fewer calories consumed.  To experience a fat loss, consumption can be managed through websites or journals.  For more information, see A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO FAT BURNING by Jeff and Barbara Galloway.

•        Help someone exercise. The psychological benefits are significant when you help someone improve the quality of their life.  Offer to walk (run, hike) with your spouse, parent, friend co-worker, child—or all of the above.  My books WALKING & GETTING STARTED have proven programs with motivation which can lead you  and your “coach-ee” through the training.

QOTD: Which of these do you need to work on? Any other tips to go along with these?

Jeff Galloway Tips: Why We Get Injured

Here are some more great tips from Jeff Galloway about injury. I find these so interesting since I struggle with injury a lot. Hopefully they will help you to run injury free!

Why do we get injured?

1.  Be aware of irritation of weak links.

The Key Weak Links are body parts where my runners tend to experience injuries are these: Knees – Feet -Calf – Achilles -Hip – Glute/piriformis/sciaticia

But the body parts that YOU need to be aware of are the sites where you are injured or suffer more aches and pains.

So if you’re sensitive to the first indication of irritation in these areas and take immediate action it’s possible to avoid injury.

2.  Stress buildup due to the way we train.

  • Training schedule is too intense-not enough rest between stress.
  • Adverse Training Components-speed is too fast or has too much, too soon.
  • Running form-too long a stride, forward lean, bouncing too high off the ground.

So staying focused on the way one runs and following these guidelines, can often allow runners to maintain a manageable increase without injury

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Top 5 ways to avoid stress buildup-and avoid injuries

1.  Take walk breaks more frequently, and run shorter run segments

2.  Form: shorter stride, feet low to the ground

3.  Slower long runs, with more walk breaks

4.  Avoid Stretching

5.  Be careful when running speed sessions

 

 

Register now for the Jeff Galloway 13.1 with no risk!  The 2nd annual half marathon on Dec. 13, 2015 is currently $95. You can sign up with no risk! Take advantage of this low price, and if you can’t make it, you can roll into the virtual option with no extra charge!

Register today at

Jeff Galloway 13.1!

Disclosure: As a Jeff Galloway blogger I am provided with tips to share with my readers.